Archive for the ‘International Rural Women Day’ Category

Actress

If anyone can be held semi-responsible for all this pushing and shoving, it’s Nicole Kidman. Back at the Academy Awards in 1997, she hit the red carpet in an exotic chartreuse haute couture gown by John Galliano for Dior. (A facsimile of the dress had been spotted just a month earlier at the Paris show and the designer worked to customize it for Kidman.) No doubt, every other actress on the carpet that night later learned to pronounce “haute couture” with just the right French flourish.

And just as wearing never-before-seen runway dresses has become de rigueur, über stylist-turned-designer Rachel Zoe has upended the buffet once again. She put longtime client Anne Hathaway in a snow-white Chanel couture gown from 2009 at this year’s Globes. What? A 3-year-old dress? “Just because a dress was seen on the runway a couple of years ago but didn’t have its moment doesn’t mean that it’s out of fashion”, says Silver. In fact, if anything, it shows that a resourceful stylist can gild a forgotten gown like anyone else would lacquer an old credenza. Zoe also put Hathaway in a black spring 2013 Giambattista Valli couture gown for the SAG Awards this year.

Catherine Kallon, who founded the popular website Red Carpet Fashion Awards in 2007, has been visually comparing runway looks and their red-carpet translations for over five years. She sniffs at any criticism about petite Hollywood actresses being swallowed by dresses designed for statuesque woman with tiny ribcages. “For the most part, I think runway dresses translate better on the red carpet”, she says. “Just look at Lucy Liu in her Carolina Herrera gown at the Golden Globes for further proof. She owned the floral ball gown”.

Actually, she borrowed that gown and it was pre-fall 2013.

Typically

Prada Goes With Her Feelings.

A fashion show typically lasts about 10 minutes, and that’s just enough time to either be suicidal from boredom or convinced you haven’t even begun to live, since you never thought of wearing a black party dress over the gray cardigan you leave at the office because you, Ms. Mouse, are always cold.
Miuccia Prada, like Rei Kawakubo and Phoebe Philo, established that there is a world of difference between men and women as designers. One difference is that a woman will readily use her feelings to build a collection instead of an outside source, like the work of an artist.

Karl Lagerfeld might be clever at loading up the pop cultural references at Fendi, and obscuring the evidence in a dizzy pile of fun furs, but you can’t imagine him trying to give a shape and texture to female repression. He’d rather stick a pen in his eye, but that’s just a guess.

More than 20 years after the sex fantasies of Gianni Versace and Jean Paul Gaultier, studded leather looks like an adolescent rash, it’s so commonplace and down-market.

No wonder Donatella Versace, in her show on Friday, made the spikes in collars and dresses four inches long. There’s no edge left to the fantasy. But male designers have never been good at the kind of fashion known as “ugly chic.” That emotional territory belongs to female designers. Actually, the territory belongs to just one.

“It’s everything I like,” said Ms. Prada before her show, referring to the done-undone quality of the outfits, with tweed or beaded chiffon dresses worn carelessly over drab cardigans, the garments left partly unbuttoned so they fell off shoulders. The midcentury silhouette, with deep fur cuffs on hard leather jackets and gray flannel suits, was another Prada favorite. The gloomy set and the wet “Les Miserables” hair seemed mostly a Prada ploy, and didn’t really add anything.

As the models lined up for the show, Ms. Prada said: “I’m obsessed with this problem — that everything is forbidden. There is so much control that you can’t abandon yourself to anything.” If Ms. Prada, who turns 64 this year, is frustrated, she shouldn’t be too concerned. A generation of women has been peculiarly susceptible to her fashion: they feel exactly what she feels. So, even if this was not the most challenging Prada collection, its naïve, almost do-it-yourself glamour still got under your skin.

Most interesting

The most interesting look in the Fendi show on Thursday was a minimalist black wool coat with a left-side panel of black shaved mink and a thin belt that half-closed the garment. The fur supplied a subdued decorative touch, the two-sidedness played a trick on your eye and the coat’s shape looked modern and easy to wear.

Mr. Lagerfeld had other two-sided pieces in this vividly colored, engaging collection, as well as dresses and coats partly overlaid with shaved fur that was cut on the round and given a neon band of color. “Fashion is almost always about illusion,” he said. There were pieces that combined leather and feathery bits in a block pattern. Or were those compacted frills actually fur? Hard to say.

“You can’t tell what the fur is today,” he said. Nor could you be really sure if some of the trousers and tops were infused with a sports influence. Waistbands were finished with what looked like striped fur. Those bright pinks and blues certainly could be found on any mall rat. Silvia Fendi brought a similar, multihued madness to accessories, including fur-blocked pumps.

But maybe the most magical thing is how Mr. Lagerfeld, in spite of the noise, managed to keep on a high level of design.

International Rural Women Day

International Rural Women Day

Thousands of women exhibit their art work at Lok Virsa

ISLAMABAD: Thousands of women hailing from various parts of the country exhibited their artwork at Lok Virsa on Saturday, marking International Day for Rural Women.
More than 30 stalls were set up showcasing embellished products produced by home-based rural women artisans, which depict culture of different provinces.
The stalls including Rural Artisan centres Chakwal and Rawalpindi, Nari Development Organization Sindh, Benazir Welfare Society, Bacha Khan Trust, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Silk Route Handicrafts displayed a variety of things including embroidery dress, cushions, bags, handicrafts and other decoration pieces.
Green Circle organization arranged a stall highlighting the importance of kitchen gardening, which would help reduce economic burden and provide fresh vegetables at home. Ministry of Human Rights arranged Shirkat Gah, Women Organization for Rights and Development (WORD) arranged Rozan to display awareness material regarding women rights and legislation.
Women Rights Activist Fauzia Saeed said that there was dire need to acknowledge women role as farmers as they were contributing in economic development of the country. She stressed the need for resource allocation at district level for women development and called for reviving local bodies system to empower them.
Fauzia said that women played vital role in peace building process so they must be encouraged to maintain peace at home, community, city, provinces, national and international level. Rehana Hashmi of Sisters Trust said that October 15 was the day to acknowledge role of women in development of the country and we must recognize their efforts as farmers, food providers, factory workers and give them a respectable position in the society.
Pakistan is one of those countries, which mark rural women day and pay tributes to the services rendered by rural women in country’ uplift, she added.
The stalls of Cavish Development Organization, Acid Survivor Foundation, National Commission on the Status of Women, Aurat Foundation, Lok Sanjh, Cholistan Development Council, Pakistan Catholic Women Organization, Council of Social Sciences and Food along with Agriculture Organizations were also set up in the exhibition, which would conclude on Sunday.