Archive for the ‘Private’ Category

Long

The Long of It.

Are the long hemlines that are sneaking into so many collections a viable option for winter 2013? The trend started with Valentino in haute couture, where the choice of skirt length is ultimately left to the client. But it is a different story with the many Italian houses that are successful ready-to-wear brands. They have to read the messages coming through at retail.

The answer seems to be: a woman’s right to choose. No one has yet gone full out for ankle-length outfits. But there are long hemline options scattered throughout.

Perhaps the most intelligent use of length was from Gabriele Colangelo, one of Milan’s rising stars and a designer who understands that modern fashion is as much about texture and fabric treatment as about cut and hemline lengths. That is why a long white coat over a short dress was a leitmotif of the collection: It had a semitransparent insert at the hips of the coat, opening a slit window on the body — in fact, a technological treatment similar to burning away. Other techniques included overlays of shiny materials against matte surfaces and yarns disintegrating into fringing.

Objection

Ms. Bacelar said she hoped the event would help bridge a communications gap. “I think that everyone in fashion is used to hearing the statement that they need to play catch-up, and they need to innovate,“ she said. “But let me tell you that from the tech side, and I work with the tech guys all the time; they are building products to pitch to the fashion vertical and they are getting it wrong all the time. So we are talking about an education that needs to happen on both fronts.”Ms. Winston Wolkoff said: “People on the tech side think very differently about fashion. It’s not just about brands, it’s about publishing and distribution and manufacturing. And when you say fashion people think clothing, but it’s more than that. It’s the business of clothing.”

On Feb. 14, Decoded Fashion announced SWATCHit, an app connecting designers with fabric creators and other artisans, as the hackathon winner. The team received $10,000 from the CFDA.

“What I loved about SWATCHit was the B to B aspect,” said Steven Kolb, the chief executive of the CFDA. “Sourcing is a difficult aspect for all designers big and small, and more efficiency in sourcing will streamline production processes. And it has the potential to expand into even more than the way they presented it.”

Speaking of presentation, many hackers paid as much attention to their own style as they did to their code. They “looked very dapper after not sleeping for 36 hours,” Mr. Uhovski said.

Really

Zero Dark Thirty’s Fashion Blooper.

In the Oscar-nominated film, Jessica Chastain’s character carries a Proenza Schouler PS1 bag. The problem? It first appears in the film five years before the bag even existed. We all know Jessica Chastain has great style – but who knew Maya, her nerdy CIA character in Zero Dark Thirty– was also fashion-forward?

And we mean really fashion forward: throughout the film, the feisty Maya carries a tote bag from high-fashion label Proenza Schouler, which retails for $2,350 in stores. But there’s a catch: she wears the bag as early as 2003 –and the Proenza Schouler PS1 bag was not actually released until 2008.

Chastain’s Maya is first spotted with the PS1 as she arrives at the US embassy in Pakistan around 2003. She carries it across the globe for the next five years while interrogating terrorists at CIA black-op sites in Poland and Afganistan. The bag takes its last on-screen turn as her character is caught in the unfortunate cross-fire at the September 20, 2008 attack on the Mariott Hotel in Islamabad—two months before the PS1 even launched in November 2008.

A representative for Proenza Schouler confirmed to The Daily Beast that it was in fact the PS1 bag that was featured throughout the film.

Private

No one fact-checked anything, including where he works.

“I work at an agriculturally focused non-profit, not banking, private equity, or finance,” he says. “I have a finance degree and worked in wholesale lending for 7 months but currently, without getting into details, you could loosely refer to me as working in agricultural export finance. Loosely being the key word here. I’ll assume the finance guy pitch was solely for publicity by my date (which was brilliant).”
That the survey went viral is not about dating but about Wall-Street bashing.

Mike says his survey “gained traction because any opportunity to ridicule Wall Street is seized upon.” He kind of has a point. See also the Time piece, see also dating spreadsheet guy, see also “How to date a Wall Street man.”
What’s so wrong with spreadsheets or “organization” anyway?

“You’re wasting a lot of time if you refuse to learn anything from your experiences by not wanting to be the ‘creepy/nerdy/analytical guy who takes notes,'” says Stolar. “It’s similar to writing in a journal, just exponentially more valuable in terms of future usability and reference.” When the story of “dating spreadsheet guy,” whom he cites as a hero, came out, I talked to a woman who kept her own spreadsheet while online dating. “Out of respect for the likely many people you are in correspondence with when online dating,” she said, “a spreadsheet is a helpful tool for everyone involved,” she said. Just don’t share it with your dates was the caveat.