Archive for the ‘Women Mary Kies’ Category

Really

Zero Dark Thirty’s Fashion Blooper.

In the Oscar-nominated film, Jessica Chastain’s character carries a Proenza Schouler PS1 bag. The problem? It first appears in the film five years before the bag even existed. We all know Jessica Chastain has great style – but who knew Maya, her nerdy CIA character in Zero Dark Thirty– was also fashion-forward?

And we mean really fashion forward: throughout the film, the feisty Maya carries a tote bag from high-fashion label Proenza Schouler, which retails for $2,350 in stores. But there’s a catch: she wears the bag as early as 2003 –and the Proenza Schouler PS1 bag was not actually released until 2008.

Chastain’s Maya is first spotted with the PS1 as she arrives at the US embassy in Pakistan around 2003. She carries it across the globe for the next five years while interrogating terrorists at CIA black-op sites in Poland and Afganistan. The bag takes its last on-screen turn as her character is caught in the unfortunate cross-fire at the September 20, 2008 attack on the Mariott Hotel in Islamabad—two months before the PS1 even launched in November 2008.

A representative for Proenza Schouler confirmed to The Daily Beast that it was in fact the PS1 bag that was featured throughout the film.

Women Mary Kies

On May 15 1809, Mary Dixon Kies received the first U. S. patent issued to a woman. Kies, a Connecticut native, invented a process for weaving straw with silk or thread. First Lady, Dolley Madison praised her for boosting the nation’s hat industry. Unfortunately, the patent file was destroyed in the great Patent Office fire in 1836. Until about 1840, only 20 other patents were issued to women. The inventions related to apparel, tools, cook stoves, and fire places.

The Patent Act of 1790 opened the door for anyone, male or female, to protect his or her invention with a patent. However, because in many states women could not legally own property independent of their husbands, many women inventors didn’t bother to patent their new inventions. Mary Kies broke that pattern on May 5, 1809.

Mary Kies was not the first American woman to improve hat making. In 1798, New Englander Betsy Metcalf invented a method of braiding straw. Her method became very popular, and she employed many women to make her hats, but she didn’t patent her process. When asked why, Metcalf said she didn’t want her name being sent to Congress. Kies had a different perspective, and she couldn’t have picked a better time to secure her new product, because the U.S. government had stopped importing European goods. (Napolean was at war with many nations of Europe at the time, and one way he tried to win the war was to block trade and hurt his enemies economically. The U.S. did not want to be drawn into this conflict.) President Madison was looking for American industries to replace the lost European goods. First lady Dolley Madison said hats off to Mary Kies for providing just such an opportunity.